FAQ

About the Chinese Medicine Ordinance

Q 1 :

When was the Chinese Medicine Ordinance passed?

A 1 :

The Chinese Medicine Ordinance (Cap. 549 of the Laws of Hong Kong) was passed by the Legislative Council on 14 July 1999.

Q 2 :

Where can the Chinese Medicine Ordinance be purchased?

A 2 :

The Chinese Medicine Ordinance can be purchased from the Government Publications Centre. The address of the Government Publications Centre is :

Government Publications Centre
Room 626, 6/F North Point Government Offices
333 Java Road, North Point, Hong Kong.

The Chinese Medicine Ordinance can also be downloaded from the government website (www.elegislation.gov.hk).

 

About the Chinese Medicine Council of Hong Kong

Q 1 :

When was the Chinese Medicine Council set up? What is its composition?

A 1 :

The Chinese Medicine Council was set up in September 1999. Its members include Chinese medicine professionals and traders, persons from educational or scientific research institutions, lay persons and government officials appointed by the Chief Executive.

Q 2 :

What is the main function of the Chinese Medicine Council?

A 2 :

The main function of the Chinese Medicine Council is to carry out and implement the regulatory measures for Chinese medicine as stipulated in the Chinese Medicine Ordinance. Regulation of Chinese medicine practitioners includes registration, examination and discipline of Chinese medicine practitioners, whereas regulation of Chinese medicines includes licensing of Chinese medicines traders and registration of proprietary Chinese medicines.

Q 3 :

What is the address of the Chinese Medicine Council?

A 3 :

The address of the Chinese Medicine Council is :

22/F Wu Chung House
213 Queen's Road East
Wanchai
Hong Kong
Enquiry no. : 2121 1888
Fax no. : 2121 1898

 

About Regulation of Chinese medicine practitioners

Q 1 :

How can one become a registered Chinese medicine practitioner?

A 1 :

According to the Chinese Medicine Ordinance, any person who wishes to be registered as a registered Chinese medicine practitioner shall undertake and pass the Licensing Examination conducted by the Chinese Medicine Practitioners Board of the Chinese Medicine Council. To be eligible to undertake the Licensing Examination, one should have satisfactorily completed such undergraduate degree course of training in Chinese medicine practice or its equivalent as is approved by the Chinese Medicine Practitioners Board.

Q 2 :

What titles can a registered Chinese medicine practitioner use?

A 2 :

Under section 74 of the Chinese Medicine Ordinance, registered Chinese medicine practitioners are entitled the Chinese titles of "香港中醫藥管理委員會註冊中醫", "香港中醫藥管理委員會註冊中醫師", "註冊中醫" or "註冊中醫師", and the English titles of "registered Chinese medicine practitioner of the Chinese Medicine Council of Hong Kong" or "registered Chinese medicine practitioner" with one of the streams of practice in Chinese "全科", "針灸" or "骨傷" or in English "general practice", "acupuncture" or "bone-setting" put in a bracket at the end of the title.

According to section 108 of the Chinese Medicine Ordinance, any person uses title, etc. unlawfully and practises without registration commits an offence, for example if any person falsely takes or uses any name, title, addition or description implying that he is a registered Chinese medicine practitioner; or he is qualified to practise Chinese medicine; or his name is included in the Register of Chinese Medicine Practitioners commits an offence and is liable to a fine at level 6 and to imprisonment for 3 years. Please refer to section 108 of the Chinese Medicine Ordinance for details.

Q 3 :

What are the differences between registered Chinese medicine practitioners and listed Chinese medicine practitioners?

A 3 :

During the period of transitional arrangements, both registered Chinese medicine practitioners and listed Chinese medicine practitioners are allowed to practise legally. Registered Chinese medicine practitioners are being registered for they have obtained professional qualifications recognized by the Chinese Medicine Practitioners Board and have undergone professional assessment. The identity of listed Chinese medicine practitioners is transitional in nature. Listed Chinese medicine practitioners have to obtain the qualification to be registered through various means, for example through the Registration Assessment or Licensing Examination.

Registered Chinese medicine practitioners have to display their practising certificates and listed Chinese medicine practitioners their notification letters for listed Chinese medicine practitioners in their practising clinics.

In addition, listed Chinese medicine practitioners can only use the title of " Chinese medicine practitioner". Only after they have passed the Registration Assessment or Licensing Examination and get registered can they use the title of " registered Chinese medicine practitioner".

Both registered and listed Chinese medicine practitioners have to comply with the professional code of practice. The Chinese Medicine Practitioners Board may conduct disciplinary inquiry against a particular registered or listed Chinese medicine practitioner and handle the matter appropriately which may include cancellation of the professional qualification of the practitioner concerned in case of any incident.

According to the Chinese Medicine Ordinance, only registered Chinese medicine practitioners are allowed to prescribe Schedule 1 Chinese herbal medicines of the Chinese Medicine Ordinance. Listed Chinese medicine practitioners are not allowed to prescribe Schedule 1 Chinese herbal medicines.

A list of the names, addresses and qualifications of all persons whose names appear in the Register of the Chinese Medicine Practitioners and a list of the names of all persons whose names appear in the List of listed Chinese medicine practitioners will be published in the gazette of the Government of the HKSAR or can be downloaded from the homepage of the Chinese Medicine Council for public reading.

Q 4 :

Can Chinese medicine practitioners from other places perform clinical teaching or scientific research in Chinese medicine in Hong Kong?

A 4 :

According to section 83 of the Chinese Medicine Ordinance, where a specified educational or scientific research institution intends to engage a non-Hong Kong registered Chinese medicine practitioner to perform clinical teaching or research in Chinese medicine for the institution, the institution may apply to the Chinese Medicine Practitioners Board on behalf of the person for limited registration of that person. The period for which the limited registration is to have effect should not exceed one year. If necessary, the institution concerned can apply for renewal. Chinese medicine practitioners with limited registration can only perform the specified clinical teaching or research in the specified institutions and cannot practise Chinese medicine privately in Hong Kong.

According to the Chinese Medicine Ordinance, the Chinese Medicine Practitioners Board has specified a list of institutions which may apply for limited registration. They are the University of Hong Kong, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Baptist University, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University and Hospital Authority.

 

About the Chinese Medicine Practitioners Licensing Examination

Q 1 :

What are the requirements for undertaking the Chinese Medicine Practitioners Licensing Examination (Licensing Examination)?

A 1 :

Under section 61 of the Chinese Medicine Ordinance, a person shall be eligible to undertake the Licensing Examination if: -

  1. he has satisfactorily completed such an undergraduate degree course of training in Chinese medicine practice or its equivalent as is approved by the Practitioners Board; or

  2. he has become a listed Chinese medicine practitioner under the transitional arrangements for registration of Chinese medicine practitioners and has been notified by the Practitioners Board that he has to undertake and pass the Chinese Medicine Practitioners Licensing Examination before he is eligible for registration as registered Chinese medicine practitioners.

The undergraduate degree course mentioned in section 61 of the Chinese Medicine Ordinance must fulfil the basic requirements as determined by the Practitioners Board, which include:

(a)
A full-time on campus degree course with duration of not less than 5 years, including a Chinese medicine clinical training of not less than 30 weeks. Other than the clinical internship and clinical practice, the course must be fully conducted in the institution awarding the bachelor degree in Chinese medicine; and
(b)
The course must include the following 10 compulsory subjects:
 
(i)
Basic Theories of Chinese Medicine;
 
(ii)
Diagnostics of Chinese Medicine;
 
(iii)
Chinese Materia Medica;
 
(iv)
Chinese Medicinal Formulary;
 
(v)
Internal Medicine of Chinese Medicine;
 
(vi)
External Medicine of Chinese Medicine;
 
(vii)
Gynaecology of Chinese Medicine;
 
(viii)
Paediatrics of Chinese Medicine;
 
(ix)
Orthopaedics and Traumatology of Chinese Medicine;
 
(x)
Acupuncture and Moxibustion of Chinese Medicine; and
(c)
If a course fulfils the requirements stated in (a) but it does not include all the compulsory subjects stated in (b), the course will be accepted as an equivalent course, if the applicant has completed the study of the relevant subject in one of the recognized institutions in accordance with the requirements as stated in Appendix 1 of the Candidates' Handbook; and
(d)
The institutions conducting the course must fulfil the basic requirements of the university and clinical teaching in terms of teaching condition, teaching/practical facilities, education management, library information, teacher qualifications, admission standard and clinical training, etc.
 

If a course is conducted, whether in whole or in part, by means of distance learning, such as correspondence, web-based or self-learning, the course does not meet the above basic requirements and will not be accepted.

Q 2 :

How to obtain the list of recognized institutions?

A 2 :

The Practitioners Board recognizes the full-time undergraduate degree courses in Chinese medicine of no less than 5-year and which fulfils the basic requirements offered by the universities and institutes stated in Table 1 of the Candidates' Handbook. The list of institutions offering recognized courses will be announced during the application period of the Licensing Examination each year.

Q 3 :

How to find out the rules and content of the Licensing Examination?

A 3 :

Candidates must obtain a pass in Part I - Written Examination (both Paper 1 and Paper 2) before they are eligible for taking Part II - Clinical Examination. The result of a pass in the Written Examination may be retained for 5 years (i.e. 5 years after the year of obtaining a pass). If a candidate cannot pass the Clinical Examination within 5 years, he must re-sit and pass the Written Examination (both Paper 1 and Paper 2) before he is eligible for undertaking the Clinical Examination again.

Starting from 2007, an applicant who applies to take the Written Examination for the first time* must enrol in both Paper 1 and Paper 2. A candidate who passes either of the two papers in 2007 or thereafter will be allowed to retain the pass result for 3 years and he may choose to make up the other paper. However, he must re-sit and pass the other paper within 3 years, otherwise he must re-sit the Written Examination (both Paper 1 and Paper 2). Other than re-sitting, an applicant must enrol in both Paper 1 and Paper 2. If a candidate enrols in both papers, the passing mark will be determined on the basis of the total score of the two papers or either paper. A candidate who passes both papers in a single examination, or passes both papers within a period of 3 years after 2007 would be regarded as having passed the Written Examination. An applicant applying to re-sit either paper of the Written Examination is required to pay the prescribed fee for the Written Examination.

(*The definitions of "taking the Written Examination for the first time" and "re-sitting the Written Examination" do not cover the attempts and the results obtained before 2007. Only those candidates who pass either of the two papers of the Written Examination in or after 2007 are eligible to re-sit the other paper.)

The syllabus of the Part I Written Examination of the Licensing Examination includes 13 subjects. Please refer to Appendix 2 of the Candidates' Handbook for details.

The Part II Clinical Examination is conducted in the form of an interview. There are 4 different cases, including 2 complete cases and 2 incomplete cases. They are chosen from six designated clinical subjects. A candidate must analyze and answer two different cases, including a complete case and an incomplete case. The interview time for the examination is 30 minutes. Candidates have 20 minutes of preparation time before the examination starts. Please refer to Appendix 3 of the Candidates' Handbook for details of the syllabus.

Q 4 :

Are there any standard teaching materials / reference books for the Licensing Examination?

A 4 :

Under section 60(1) of the Chinese Medicine Ordinance, the Practitioners Board shall determine the examination syllabus, format and standard of assessment and related matters in respect of the Licensing Examination. The examination syllabus of the Licensing Examination has been published in the Candidates' Handbook. As the Licensing Examination mainly tests the basic Chinese medicine theories and clinical knowledge of the candidates, the basic theories contained in any Chinese medicine teaching materials are generally more or less the same, and there is no fundamental difference in the elaboration of the basic Chinese medicine theories among different versions of the Chinese medicine teaching materials of the tertiary institutions, no standard teaching materials are designated for the Licensing Examination.

Q 5 :

Will the Practitioners Board publicise the passing mark for the Licensing Examination?

A 5 :

The Licensing Examination consists of two parts: Part I - Written Examination and Part II - Clinical Examination. The passing mark for Part I - Written Examination is 55% of the total mark of 300, that is 165; and the passing mark for Part II - Clinical Examination is 60% of the total mark of 200, that is 120.

Q 6 :

How will the Part II Clinical Examination of the Licensing Examination be assessed?

A 6 :

The Clinical Examination aims to test the candidates' basic clinical knowledge and skills on Chinese medicine. The candidates are required to apply their Chinese medicine clinical knowledge with comprehensive analysis and flexibility to solve real clinical situations. The examiners will take into consideration the reasonability of the answers of the candidates as a whole in making assessment.

 

About Continuing Education in Chinese medicine

Q 1 :

What are the requirements for continuing education in Chinese medicine ?

A 1 :

Under section 82 of the Chinese Medicine Ordinance, the Chinese Medicine Practitioners Board may, on the advice of the Registration Committee, make arrangements for the accreditation of continuing education in Chinese medicine, either on its own or in conjunction with any other person or educational institution. A practising certificate can be renewed only if its holder complies with the requirements of continuing education in Chinese medicine. The Chinese Medicine Practitioners Board will announce the requirements for continuing education in due course.

 

About Issuing of sick leave certificates and other medical proofs by registered Chinese medicine practitioners

Q 1 :

What are the differences between registered Chinese medicine practitioners (CMPs) and listed CMPs?

A 1 :

To allow CMPs who were practising in Hong Kong before implementation of the Chinese Medicine Ordinance (CMO) to continue the practice, the CMO provides for transitional arrangements for the registration of CMPs. Any CMP who was practising Chinese medicine in Hong Kong on 3 January 2000 may apply within the application period for listing as listed CMPs in accordance with the requirements and criteria of the CMO and the Chinese Medicine Practitioners Board (the Practitioners Board). The application period for listing of CMPs was closed on 30 December 2000. During the transitional period, a listed CMP may continue to practise in Hong Kong until he had been registered as a registered CMP or a date to be announced in the gazette by the Secretary of Health and Food.

Under Section 92 to 95 of the CMO, the Practitioners Board of the Chinese Medicine Council (the council) has assessed the practising experience and academic qualifications of all listed CMPs based on the information submitted by them in the listing applications to determine their alternative qualifying requirements for registration.

Any person who is not a listed CMP but intends to practise Chinese medicine in Hong Kong must hold an undergraduate degree in Chinese medicine, or its equivalent, as is approved by the Practitioners Board and must have passed the licensing examination conducted by the Practitioners Board, before he may apply to become a registered CMP. A registered CMP is allowed to practise Chinese medicine in Hong Kong only after he is granted a valid practising certificate. The lists of registered CMPs and listed CMPs are available on the website of the council.

The major differences between registered CMPs and listed CMPs in respect of practice include: (i) the title to be used; (ii) the kind of certificate to be displayed in the clinic; (3) the code of practice for Chinese medicine to be observed; and (4) the right to prescribe toxic Chinese herbal medicines in practice. For details, please refer to the information leaflet "Registered and Listed Chinese Medicine Practitioners" prepared by the Chinese Medicine Division of the Department of Health.

Q 2 :

How can one tell whether a person is a registered CMP or not?

A 2 :

Members of the public can tell if a person is a registered CMP through the following means:

(i) Checking the person's practising certificate -
- As required by the Code of Practice for Registered Chinese Medicine Practitioners in Hong Kong (Code of Practice), a registered CMP practising in Hong Kong should display his practising certificate at a conspicuous place in the clinic.
(ii) Checking against the website of the council -
- A list of registered CMPs (including CMPs with limited registration) has been uploaded to the website of the council for public access.
(iii) Making an enquiry with the CMC by telephone on 2121 1888.
Q 3 :

Apart from registered CMPs, can listed CMPs and CMPs with limited registration issue sick leave certificates?

A 3 :

After the amended Employment Ordinance became effective on 1 December 2006, sick leave certificates issued by registered CMPs and CMPs with limited registration are recognized under the Employment Ordinance. Individual employers may make their own decisions on whether to recognize the sick leave certificates issued by listed CMPs.

Q 4 :

How can one access the Reference guide on Issuance of Sick Leave Certificates by Registered Chinese Medicine Practitioners (the Reference Guide) (Chinese only)

A 4 :

The Practitioners Board of the council has distributed the reference guide to each registered CMP. In addition, the reference guide has been uploaded to the website of the council.

Q 5 :

Is the reference guide legally binding?

A 5 :

Reference guide on the issuance of sick leave certificates by registered CMPs compiled by the Practitioners Board is a reference without statutory status. Registered CMPs should issue appropriate sick leave certificates based on their professional judgement and the particular circumstances of individual patients.

Q 6 :

Should CMPs prepare sick leave certificate forms and set the format of the certificate on their own?

A 6 :

CMP should design and print the sick leave certificate forms by themselves. A sample is given for reference at Appendix of the reference guide published in 2003 by the Practitioners Board of the council.

Q 7 :

When a patient asks for a sick leave certificate, can a CMP charge an extra fee?

A 7 :

There is no legal requirement against charging a fee for issuance of sick leave certificates by CMPs. The current Code of Practice contains no provision against charging a fee for issuance of sick leave certificates by CMPs. Concerning the rights of consumers, CMPs should first tell patients the fee schedule for issuance of sick leave certificates. In respect of the regulation of the Chinese medicine profession, a patient, considering that a CMP has done something which has fallen short of the standards of conduct expected among his professional colleagues during the practice, may make a complaint to the Disciplinary Committee.

Q 8 :

Can CMPs issue sick leave certificates with retrospective effect to patients?

A 8 :

The reference guide prepared by the Practitioners Board highlights the general issues in relation to the issuance of sick leave certificates by registered CMPs, including — Sick leave certificates issued by CMPs should be up to the professional standard. CMPs should not recommend excessive sick leave and the duration of each sick leave should not exceed 7 days. If needed, CMPs may issue another sick leave certificate in the next consultation and it is not appropriate for CMPs to back date a sick leave certificate.

Q 9 :

Can CMPs issue sick leave certificates to family members?

A 9 :

CMPs are not forbidded by law to issue sick leave certificates to their family members. Regarding insurance indemnity, insurance companies may make their own decisions on whether to accept or reject sick leave certificates issued by CMPs to their family members.

Q 10 :

If an employer or an insurance company asks a CMP for patient records or relevant documents, what should a CMP do to protect a patient's privacy?

A 10 :

CMPs should follow the requirements of the Personal Data (Privacy) Ordinance and may visit the website of the Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data, Hong Kong (www.pcpd.org.hk; Tel: 2827 2827) for details. Besides, it is better to communicate in writing when handling request for medical records or other personal particulars of patients. Patients may authorize the CMPs in advance to disclose their personal information to employers or insurance companies.

Q 11 :

If a CMP provides services in a certain medical centre, could / should he take away the records of patients under his care on leaving the service?

A 11 :

The Code of Practice only requires CMPs to keep medical records of patients, but does not specify the place of storage. If a CMP is employed by a medical institution, the place of storage of medical records is governed by the agreement between the CMP and the medical institution. The agreement may allow the CMP to take with him the medical records when he leaves the institution or to leave the medical records with the institution.

Q 12 :

If an employer or an employee has any doubt about the sick leave certificate issued by a certain registered CMP, who should he turn to?

A 12 :

An employer or an employee who has any doubt on the information stated in a sick leave certificate should make enquiries directly with the attending registered CMP who issued the sick leave certificate.

Q 13 :

How can an employer or an employee make an enquiry or a complaint if he has any doubt on the practice of a CMP or suspects that the practice of a registered CMP constitutes professional misconduct?

A 13 :

Members of the public who have any doubt on the practice of any CMP or suspect that the practice of a registered CMP constitutes professional misconduct can make an enquiry or complaint with the Practitioners Board of the council. The means of contact are:

Address: 22th floor, Wu Chung House, 213 Queen's Road East, Wanchai, Hong Kong.

Tel. no.: 2121 1888

Fax no.: 2121 1898

Website: http://www.cmchk.org.hk

Q 14 :

Where should members of the public approach for enquiries about the legitimacy of sick leave certificates and details of labour laws?

A 14 :

Regarding the statutory status of the sick leave certificates and details of the labour ordinance, please contact the Labour Department at 2717 1771 for further information.

Q 15 :

The workplace of CMPs with limited registration is governed by the Practitioners Board of the CMC. Under the amendments to the Employment Ordinance, is it bound to recognize sick leave certificates issued by CMPs with limited registration at any non-designated place of Chinese medicine practice? As an employer, how can I find out the designated place of practice in respect of a CMP with limited registration?

A 15 :

According to the amended Employment Ordinance, sick leave certificates issued by registered CMPs, including CMPs with limited registration, are bound to be recognized.

At present, a total of six local educational or scientific research institutions may apply for limited registration on behalf of the Chinese medicine experts they employ. They include the University of Hong Kong, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Baptist University, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, the City University of Hong Kong and the Hospital Authority of Hong Kong. Members of the public who wish to check the designated place of Chinese medicine practice in respect of a certain CMP with limited registration may contact the council secretariat in writing.

The council can be contacted through:

Address: 22th floor, Wu Chung House, 213 Queen's Road East, Wanchai, Hong Kong.

Telephone: 2121 1888

Fax: 2121 1898

Email: info@cmchk.org.hk

Website: http://www.cmchk.org.hk

If it is reported to the Practitioners Board of the council that a CMP with limited registration practises Chinese medicine at a non-designated place of practice, the case will be dealt with in accordance with the regulations of the CMO.

Q 16 :

Can a registered CMP post a notice at a conspicuous place of the clinic (such as reception area) that no sick leave certificate will be issued?

A 16 :

After the amended Employment Ordinance became effective on 1 December 2006, employers are legally bound to recognise the sick leave certificates issued by registered CMPs which are submitted by their employees. Registered CMPs should issue appropriate sick leave certificates in accordance with their professional judgment with due regard to the circumstances of individual patients.

Q 17 :

Through what channels can members of the public find out if a registered CMP has a valid practising certificate?

A 17 :

Under the amended Employment Ordinance, a number of medical functions performed by a registered CMP are recognised, including issuance of sick leave certificates. The list of registered CMPs contains two parts, (1) persons registered under section 69 of the CMO; and (2) CMPs with limited registration registered under section 85 of the CMO. The list is promulgated every year in the Gazette and has been uploaded to the website of CMC (www.cmchk.org.hk). According to the CMO, the above registered CMPs for Chinese medicine practice under part (1) should possess a valid practising certificate while the practising certificate is valid for three years in general. The Code of Practice stipulates that registered CMPs should display the practising certificate at a conspicuous place in the clinic. Members of the public can check with an individual practising CMP the validity period of his practising certificate.

Q 18 :

What should a Chinese medicine practitioner do if a patient requests to split receipts of consultation fees?

A 18 :

To ensure high standards of professional practice of Chinese medicine practitioners, the Chinese Medicine Practitioners Board of the Chinese Medicine Council of Hong Kong has compiled professional codes of practice a Code of Practice to provide guidelines for Chinese medicine practitioners, so that they can conform to the professional standards and requirements in carrying out professional responsibilities. If the Practitioners Board is satisfied that a Chinese medicine practitioner, in the pursuit of his profession, has done something which has fallen short of the standards of conduct expected among his professional colleagues, or does something which is reasonably regarded as disgraceful, unethical or dishonourable by his professional colleagues who are of good repute and competency, then the Practitioners Board may rule that the Chinese medicine practitioner is guilty of professional misconduct.

Besides, the Medical Insurance Association of the Hong Kong Federation of Insurers has, through various associations of Chinese medicine practitioners in Hong Kong, appealed to registered Chinese medicine practitioners not to split receipts of consultation fees, so as to avoid contravening any criminal offences by aiding an insured member to get premium of consultation fees by cheating or fraud. Other than possible criminal liabilities, a Chinese medicine practitioner would also commit professional misconduct if it reveals that he has aided an insured member to get premium of consultation fees by cheating or fraud.

Q 19 :

What should a Chinese medicine practitioner do if a patient requests to have the amount of consultation fees indicated on prescriptions and receipts issued to the patient?

A 19 :

The codes of practice do not specify that Chinese medicine practitioners should not indicate the amount of consultation fees on both of the prescriptions and receipts issued to patients. According to the professional codes of practice, issued prescriptions should include the following information: name, address, contact telephone number and signature of the Chinese medicine practitioner; name of patient; names and dosages of all Chinese herbal medicines; preparation method and route of administration for that prescription of Chinese herbal medicines; method of use of the proprietary Chinese medicines; number of times for re-dispensing, if any; and issuing date of the prescription. Receipts of consultation fees issued by Chinese medicine practitioners shall also meet the reasonable standards of conduct expected among his professional colleagues.

It is known that the Medical Insurance Association of Hong Kong Federation of Insurers, through various associations of Chinese medicine practitioners in Hong Kong, appeals to registered Chinese medicine practitioners not to indicate the amount charged on prescriptions issued to patients. Such amount charged must only be mentioned on the receipts issued to patients. This appeal is being made in order to prevent an insured member from submitting a prescription and receipt which are issued for the same service separately to different insurance companies, and thereby making a dual claim and profit. Making a dual claim is a violation of the principles of indemnity in medical insurance, i.e. an insurance policy indemnifies an insured member only to the extent of the amount the insured member has paid for each consultation.

The Chinese Medicine Practitioners Board of the Chinese Medicine Council of Hong Kong does not have any objection to the Medical Insurance Association of the Hong Kong Federation of Insurers' appeal to registered Chinese medicine practitioners.

Should registered Chinese medicine practitioners have any enquiries regarding the issuance of documents, including receipts, to tie in with patients' claims of medical insurance, please contact Hong Kong Federation of Insurers directly (tel. no.: 2520 1868; email address: hkfi@hkfi.org.hk; website: http://www.hkfi.org.hk).

 

About Promotion materials on Chinese medicine